Today’s Headlines

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  • To fight traffic congestion, invest in bikes and mass transit (Curbed)
  • Bike-share in Bay Area rebrands, starts bringing back e-bikes (Fast Company)
  • Uber’s plan for flying taxis won’t need new aviation laws, say Uber execs (Smart Cities Dive)
  • Could CA repeal constitutional barrier to affordable housing? (Bay City Beacon)
  • San Diego’s transit chief says MTS vision does not conflict with SANDAG’s long-term regional plans (Voice of San Diego)
  • Stop wringing your hands about climate change and just do what needs doing (Vice)
  • Looking forward to connecting the Bay Trail over the Richmond Bridge (ABC7)
  • Federal bill would prevent FHWA from taking back some transportation funding (The Reporter)
  • Bike-share is a good investment for communities (Topeka Capital-Journal)
  • PG&E bankruptcy could imperil plan for 100% clean energy (Sacramento Bee)
  • California struggles with what to do about plastic (SF Chronicle)

More California headlines at Streetsblog LA and Streetsblog SF

Today’s Headlines

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  • Bay Area heat is hard on everyone, including BART (SF Chronicle)
  • Bike lanes need to be for everyone (Fast Company)
  • Should public transit fares be abolished? (Urbanist)
  • 25 years after Speed, bus speeds in L.A. are quite a bit slower than 50 mph (Transfers)
  • Google is making lots of money from local news (via advertising) while local outlets are dying (support your local newspaper)  (New York Times)
  • Electronic Frontier Foundation calls scooter bill A.B. 1112 a “privacy” bill–even though it does nothing to prevent collection of trip data
  • More about Lyft suing S.F. over bike-share (Curbed)
  • Do young people have a constitutional right to protection from climate change? White House says no, but court case proceeds. Slowly. (NY Times)
  • Why Oregon’s cap-and-trade matters to California (CALmatters)
  • Making a case for carbon offsets (Phys.org)
  • Court reverses ruling that blocked Keystone Pipeline (KTVQ)

More California headlines at Streetsblog LA and Streetsblog SF

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