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Walk S.F. Launches Vision Zero Report Cards

3:52 PM PST on January 25, 2021

overhead shot of pedestrians trying to use crosswalk in SF, with cars blocking cross traffic

Twenty-nine people were killed in traffic crashes in 2020 in San Francisco, the same as the previous year. There were also some 600 people seriously injured. Despite a depressed economy and stay-at-home orders, it's obvious that San Francisco is failing in its Vision Zero efforts. Partially in response to this, Walk San Francisco has launched 'Vision Zero report cards' to grade the city's performance on pulling off essential safety improvements, district by district.

Their cards could help identify which districts need the most work. And they want your help in doing the evaluations. From Walk San Francico's release:

In its work to hold the City accountable in preventing these tragedies, advocacy group Walk San Francisco (Walk SF) analyzed traffic safety data at the district level and created ‘Vision Zero report cards’.

“Many people have had close calls or witnessed traffic crashes,” said Jodie Medeiros, executive director of Walk San Francisco. “Now they can see some of the data behind dangerous streets in their neighborhood.”

The Vision Zero report cards for each district launched today by Walk SF include: 1) how many people have been killed or severely injured since the City committed to Vision Zero in January 2014; 2) which streets and intersections are the most dangerous; and 3) where safety improvements have happened – and where are they lacking.

The Vision Zero report cards also detail what Walk San Francisco considers to be “basic pedestrian safety improvements,” everything from high-visibility painted crosswalks to giving pedestrians a head start crossing the street before drivers get the green.

“These basic pedestrian safety improvements all add up to save lives,” said Medeiros. “The City has made progress over the past six years, but many of these improvements still aren’t completed at the most dangerous intersections.”

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“There are deadly streets in every district. Now’s the time for people from every corner of the city to say, ‘Yes: San Francisco can and must prioritize traffic safety,” added Medeiros. “And if they do, a lot is possible, even with less funding. Vision Zero is the right solution, but the City must be laser focused on it.”

Be sure to fill out the report card for your district on Walk S.F.'s reporting page.

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