Skip to Content
Streetsblog California home
Streetsblog California home
Log In

They're no longer exiles on Main Street.

Bus riders in Cincinnati finally have a place of their own as the Queen City kicked off a six-month dedicated lane pilot project.

During rush hour for two hours in the morning and evening on Main Street, the righthand lane will be reserved for buses — a move that will speed 11,000 riders of the 16 bus routes that use the corridor daily.

"We feel listened to right now," said Cam Hardy, president of the Better Bus Coalition, a volunteer grassroots advocacy group that championed the change. "This is a part of our effort to address low-hanging fruit, deficiencies within the system."

Locals were calling it a rare example of cross-agency collaboration and grassroots influence.

https://twitter.com/brendono/status/1059447484257329152?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw
https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

City Councilman PG Sittenfeld, a likely candidate for mayor in 2020, was a key ally, said Hardy.

The goal is to move people - in a way that is better, faster, smarter & more cost-effective. That double-meaning is also fitting: If we get this right, people are spending less time on their commute, and more time with family & doing the things they love. #OnTheMove pic.twitter.com/hKepUQijQi

— P.G. Sittenfeld (@PGSittenfeld) November 5, 2018

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

The bus lane is marked with solid white lines and signs. Hardy says his group will press for paint. The city reports it will enforce the rules, issuing $100 fines to first-time violators. But early reports suggest drivers are respecting the signs.

Riding @cincinnatimetro now, overheard bus driver talking to passengers about how the bus-only lane is supposed to save drivers time moving through Downtown: “I watched it this morning. It did it for real.” @WCPO

— Pat LaFleur (@pat_laFleur) November 5, 2018

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

More is to come, Hardy vowed.

"We have a plan for an entire network," he told Streetsblog.

With its pilot, Cincinnati joins a growing number of cities trying out temporary bus lanes, including Pittsburgh, Boston and Washington. Boston actually moved to make its rush hour bike lane permanent after a one-month trial earlier this year.

Stay in touch

Sign up for our free newsletter

More from Streetsblog California

Port Lobbyists Trying to Kill Bike and Pedestrian Safety in Oakland

Trucking/port lobbyists want to destroy a long-established plan to build protected bike lanes connecting Jack London Square, West Oakland, and downtown

July 12, 2024

Friday Video: Take a Spin on Boston’s Electric Cargo Bike Share

Can't afford a $7,000 Urban Arrow cargo e-bike ? In Boston, you can now rent one for just a few bucks.

July 12, 2024

Friday’s Headlines

5 recommendations for high-speed rail; Caltrans, stop building new freeway lanes already; "Data bikes" can collect information about bike path conditions; More

July 12, 2024

Next Week: Active Transportation Program Workshop

The good news is that there will be a Cycle 7. But it will be small, and there will be hard choices about what gets funded.

July 11, 2024

Metro and Caltrans Still Planning 605 Expansion, Plus Four Connecting Freeways

Metro and Caltrans are planning to spend billions of dollars widening the 605, 5, 10, 60 and 105 Freeways. Really.

July 11, 2024
See all posts