Skip to Content
Streetsblog California home
Streetsblog California home
Log In
CA Environmental Quality Act (CEQA)

SF Supervisors Save Hairball Improvements from Lengthy Environmental Review

10:31 AM PST on November 29, 2017

The “Hairball” bike path. Photo: Streetsblog/Rudick

Note: GJEL Accident Attorneys regularly sponsors coverage on Streetsblog San Francisco and Streetsblog California. Unless noted in the story, GJEL Accident Attorneys is not consulted for the content or editorial direction of the sponsored content.

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors voted unanimously today to reject an appeal for a lengthy environmental review of proposed bicycle and pedestrian improvements to the Hairball, a mess of streets, ramps, sidewalks and bike lanes that come together at the intersection of Cesar Chavez and 101.

As SF Bay reported, the appeal was filed by attorney Mary Miles on behalf of the “Coalition for Adequate Review," alleging that the project was illegally cut up into smaller pieces to avoid a comprehensive and legally required environmental review.

Sherie George, an environmental planner with the San Francisco Planning Department, told the board that the 'SFMTA Hairball Intersection Improvement Project' involves only minor bike lane improvements, using paint and safe-hit posts, and is thereby not significant enough to require an environmental review. "It will add bike lanes on Bayshore Boulevard ... high-visibility crosswalks, the removal of ten parking spaces and two loading zones," she said, but "...no construction of any permanent structures and no existing travel lanes would be removed." Thalia Leng, the SFMTA project manager for the plan, said it was intended to address bicycle and pedestrian conflicts with "heavy vehicular volume on north-bound Jerrold Avenue, especially trucks." She reminded the board that the current design resulted in the fatality of a pedestrian in 2013.

From the SFMTA's presentation today. Image: SFMTA
From the SFMTA's presentation today. Image: SFMTA
false

Charles Deffarges, community organizer for the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition, was one of a handful of advocates from the public who spoke against the appeal and against delaying the project. "We have to uphold protected bike lanes especially along high injury corridors like Jerrold Avenue," he said. No one spoke in favor of the appeal, although Miles filed a written statement, according to the supervisors.

Cesar Chavez at evans, where the newly approved plan will relieve bike commuters of having to merge with trucks.
Cesar Chavez at Evans, where the newly approved plan will relieve bike commuters of having to merge with trucks.
false

Miles, meanwhile, is the same attorney who, along with her client Rob Anderson, enjoined the entire San Francisco bike plan and delayed safety projects across the city nearly a decade ago.

A list of all the planned Hairball improvements and a timeline for their installation is available on the SFMTA web page.

Stay in touch

Sign up for our free newsletter

More from Streetsblog California

California Launches New Transportation Equity Tool

The Transportation Equity Index maps out crash rates and creates a new way to map out multimodal access

March 4, 2024

Experts Urge Feds To Get Impaired Driving Tech Right — And They Need Your Help

A new vehicle safety tech requirement could save 10,000+ lives a year, a new working group says – but only if we implement it in a thoughtful way that wins public acceptance.

March 4, 2024

Bikeways Update: Beach Bike Path Damage, 7th Street, and More

Updates on: beach bike path in Pacific Palisades, Michigan Greenway in Santa Monica, Parthenia Place in North Hills, 7th Street Streetscape in DTLA, and Imperial Highway near LAX

March 4, 2024

New Right-of-Way Guidelines Can Make Cities More Accessible

America has waited more than 12 years for the Public Right-of-Way Accessibility Guidelines to be implemented. Here's why they matter.

March 4, 2024
See all posts