Skip to Content
Streetsblog California home
Streetsblog California home
Log In
Streetsblog LA

L.A. Planning Dept Releases Transit-Oriented Development Incentives

Detail of City Planning’s proposed tiered zones for incentivizing transit-oriented development. Full DCP map below.

Now that Measure S has clearly been soundly defeated, the city of Los Angeles is implementing that other planning reform measure that actually passed. Measure JJJ, or the "Build Better L.A." initiative, received 64.8 percent approval in the November 2016 election.

Under JJJ, for developments with ten or more residential units, if the city grants a variance (such as building taller than zoning rules allow by right), the developer is required to include affordable housing. The affordable housing could be on site, or within a few miles of the project, or could be in the form of an in-lieu payment to L.A.’s Affordable Housing Trust Fund. Variances also trigger requirements to hire locally and pay prevailing wages.

Along with the variance provision, which applies citywide, Measure JJJ creates a “Transit Oriented Communities Affordable Housing Overlay” within a half-mile radius of major transit stops. This TOC zone includes incentives for affordable housing, increased density, and decreased parking requirements.

City Planning's proposed Transit-Oriented Communities overlay zone. Image via DCP
City Planning's proposed Transit-Oriented Communities map. Image via the Department of City Planning
false

Earlier this week, the city of L.A. Department of City Planning released proposed guidelines for its Transit Oriented Communities Affordable Housing Incentive Program. The department also released its FAQ sheet and a draft study on how much developers would pay in in-lieu fees for off-site affordable housing.

The guidelines feature four tiers of incentives based on how close the site is to high-quality transit.

Proposed four tiers for transit-oriented development incentives. Image via DCP
Proposed four tiers for transit-oriented development incentives. Image via the Department of City Planning
false

Based on which tier the project qualifies for, the city allows for a greater number of units, increased floor area ratio, and reduced parking requirements (including un-bundling parking from housing). In addition, transit-oriented developments may be granted additional incentives regarding setbacks/yards, open space, lot coverage, lot width, and building height.

For additional details, see the 11-page proposed guidelines document, the FAQ, or coverage at Urbanize.

DCP is seeking public comments through April 13. The proposal is scheduled to go before the City Planning Commission on May 11, and the commission's recommendation then goes back to the Director of Planning for a final decision.

Stay in touch

Sign up for our free newsletter

More from Streetsblog California

Friday’s Headlines

Rep. Waters hates the people mover; SacRT's new transportation hub; Lessons learned from a long bike ride; More

July 19, 2024

The Active Transportation Program Has to Strategize About its Severely Reduced Funding

Funding for Cycle 7 of the Active Transportation Program is less than $200 million, and already there have been requests for fifteen times the amount of available funding

July 18, 2024

This Heat Wave Is a Car Dependency Problem

Our quickly warming planet has a unique impact on people who don't or can't drive — and we need policy action to protect their health.

July 18, 2024

We Need to Stop Killing People On Our Roads; A New ‘Bikes Belong’ Campaign Could Help

A ground-breaking campaign in the 90s helped deliver the federal money America needed to fund active transportation infrastructure. Is it time to re-launch it?

July 18, 2024

Eyes on the Street: Hollywood Boulevard Bike Lanes are Open

The Hollywood bike lanes project, already very much in use, is also already being criticized by commenters at Nextdoor and other social media

July 18, 2024
See all posts