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California Brings Home Four TIGER Grants, Three for Passenger Rail

Map of the Redlands Passenger Rail Project. For more information, click ##http://www.sanbag.ca.gov/projects/redlands-sb-rail/RPRPFactSheetFebruary262014FINAL_000.pdf##here.## (PDF)
Map of the Redlands Passenger Rail Project. For more information, and a larger map, click ##http://www.sanbag.ca.gov/projects/redlands-sb-rail/RPRPFactSheetFebruary262014FINAL_000.pdf##here.## (PDF)
Map of the Redlands Passenger Rail Project. For more information, click ##http://www.sanbag.ca.gov/projects/redlands-sb-rail/RPRPFactSheetFebruary262014FINAL_000.pdf##here.## (PDF)

The State of California earned four federal Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) grants to improve transportation from the federal government totaling $40 million, Senator Diane Feinstein announced earlier today.

“Upgrading our transportation infrastructure is key for economic growth and improving the quality of life for Californians,” said Feinstein in a press release. “Our state is home to 40 million people and it’s critical that we invest in a wide range of transportation options. This important federal funding will allow California to do just that.”  

Three of the four grants will improve transit service with another grant funding a one-mile road widening project in the small Sutter County city of Live Oak. The four grants are:

    • $15 million to the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) to separate the roadway and rail tracks at the intersection of Rosecrans and Marquardt Avenues in Santa Fe Springs, which sees more than 45,000 vehicles and 130 train crossings daily.
    • $8.7 million to San Bernardino County to construct the Redlands Passenger Rail Project from Redlands through Loma Linda to San Bernardino.
    • $6.3 million to Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) to refurbish the 19th Street Oakland BART station, including better bicycle and pedestrian access.
    • $10 million to the City of Live Oak to redesign a one-mile stretch of State Route 99, adding a fourth lane and a two-way turn lane.

TIGER is a supplementary discretionary grant program introduced in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. The legislation provided $1.5 billion for a National Surface Transportation System through September 30, 2011, "to be awarded on a competitive basis for capital investments in surface transportation projects".

While funding for the program technically expired in 2011, US DOT continues to allocate funds according to the same formula and under the TIGER name.

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