Today’s Headlines

  • Making bikeshare accessible to low-income folks is not proving to be easy (CityLab)
  • More about expanding bikeshare in the Bay Area (California Aggie)
  • Parklets may come to Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz Sentinel)
  • High-speed rail starting to apply eminent domain in Fresno (Fresno Bee)
  • Napa Valley’s transportation plan is a little short on funds, especially for bikes (Napa Valley Register)
  • Fairfield City Council would support lowering the voter threshold for local transportation taxes, barely (Daily Republic)
  • The case against one-way streets (Wonkblog)
  • AARP on why transit, bikes, and walking are good for us (AARP)
  • Seventy-five percent increase in the cost of driving is coming! (Palo Alto Online)

More California headlines at Streetsblog LA and Streetsblog SF

  • Gezellig

    Important point from the one-way street article:

    The argument that he makes with Gilderbloom isn’t so much that all one-way roads are bad, or that they contribute to these problems in every context. One-way roads can be narrow and quiet, conducive to cycling and pedestrians.

    There’s a big difference between this kind of one-way (for cars) street:

    https://cyclinginchristchurch.files.wordpress.com/2012/07/vancouver-greenway4.jpg

    and this kind of one-way street:

    http://sf.streetsblog.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2015/04/pine-larkin.jpg

    It’s all about the number of lanes.

    In gridded areas I’ve often thought that one method to avoid the parking-removal wars would be to turn two-way residential streets to one-way while still preserving all on-street car parking spots (see before/after attachments at end of message).

    This allows for local car access and preserves all parking spaces but significantly cuts down on the temptation to speed through. For added effect car flow on the same street can change every other block (while still allowing two-way for bikes). This still maintains local car access and gives residents a calmed street that’s no longer possible to use as a speedy thru-route.