Does Bike-Share Replace or Enhance Transit Use? That Depends

ucla_its_infographics_bikeshare_14

This graphic is based on research by two UC Berkeley faculty into the effects of bike-share use in different U.S. cities. It was originally published in Access Magazine by the UCLA Institute of Transportation Studies.

The researchers found that bike-share users are a practical bunch: they tend to use bike-share to reach transit, if it’s far away from them. If their trips are shorter, they use bike-share instead of transit—the effect of which could be freeing up space on crowded transit lines.

The article on which this information is based can be found here.

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