U.C. Institute For Transportation Studies Vies For Increased State Funding

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UC ITS research supports livability globally. One example is this ITS UC Davis report quantifying the benefits of urban cycling. Image via ITS UC Davis.

California’s 2016 budget may include additional funding for sustainable transportation research, education, and outreach.  The California Assembly’s proposed budget includes a $3 million increase for the University of California Institute of Transportation Studies. The funding increase was shepherded through the budget subcommittee by Assemblymember Richard Bloom, a SBCA Streetsie award winner. The budget item will now be considered by a conference committee.

Over the years, University of California Institute of Transportation Studies research has substantially helped California’s ongoing transition to livable streets and sustainable transportation. The Institute supports research centers at several U.C. campuses – Berkeley, Davis, Irvine, and Los Angeles – each engaged in exploring and important topics and producing useful data for policy makers, planners, and advocates throughout the state.

There are numerous ways that the UC ITS research has played important roles in advancing livability throughout the state, and indeed the world:

Through its engineering and planning programs, UC ITS produces more transportation professionals each year than any other US institution. Graduates of the UC program work in city and county planning departments, transit agencies, nonprofits, and planning and design firms. Streetsblog California Editor Melanie Curry is a graduate of UC Berkeley’s Transportation/City Planning program. 

California currently faces a transportation funding shortfall as the gasoline tax loses purchasing power, and some decision-makers are concerned that a $3 million increase for the UC ITS would mean less money for bridges and highways.

Changing the way California uses its streets is hard.  Overcoming the status quo requires political will. Changing political will requires research and education, which is what UC ITS specializes in. “We think research needs to be part of the solution to overcome funding challenges. California needs to find ways to more cost-effectively build and maintain the infrastructure needed to move people. UC ITS research has helped this effort in the past and will continue to do so in the future while also finding ways to make the transportation system more sustainable and safer for all users,” said UCLA ITS Director Brian Taylor.

  • UC should get more money for studies like the one on how San Francisco has a radically flawed method of counting bicycle accidents, overlooking many accidents treated at SF General Hospital, the major trauma center in SF. Odd that the study is still unmentioned by the San Francisco media.

    The notion that riding a bike in SF is more dangerous than we’ve been told by City Hall and the Bicycle Coalition for the last ten years apparently must be kept from the people of San Francisco:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23032807

    The New York Times thought the San Francisco study was worth mentioning to its readers:
    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/10/21/how-safe-is-cycling-its-hard-to-say/?_r=1

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