Today’s Headlines

  • BART will give up on late-night buses to eastern Contra Costa County (KRON)
  • Those raised bike lanes in San Francisco just aren’t enough (Wired)
  • Bike advocates Friends of the Polo Field fix up the track in Golden Gate Park (SF Bicycle Coalition)
  • Traffic deaths rose at beginning of 2015, probably due to distracted driving (NY Times)
  • Yes, high speed rail construction bids are coming in lower than cost estimates (PolitiFact)
  • Video: European Bike Stealing Championships 2015 (YouTube)

More California headlines at Streetsblog LA and Streetsblog SF.

  • 94110

    I didn’t make it past the second paragraph of the Wired article. “Hundreds of cyclists ride down Market each day”. How many hundreds? Around 30 hundreds*. I think we have a better term for that: thousands.

    * According to http://sf.streetsblog.org/2015/04/01/market-street-bike-count-off-to-a-record-breaking-start-in-2015/

  • Wired’s coverage of the raised bikeways in San Francisco shows a fundamental misunderstanding of how bikes actually work that is unfortunately all too common among urbanists. The goal of the structures referenced, especially in The NLs and Denmark, is not show. That they are iconic takes a very distant second place, though the Dutch are outdoing themselves practically weekly with another new bridge or tunnel. Nevertheless, the primary goal of all the projects is function; either filling in a gap in the Copenhagen case or getting bikes out of the way to improve throughput for cars at the Hovenring. However, both of those facilities are not in a city center. Inside city limits, where most biking occurs, the more mundane things that they thumbed their noses at like bike boulevards and raised bikeways are what actually lead to a higher participation rate in biking. Almost no American city is ready for any iconic project. We need to be spending our money on a backbone network that will serve everyone.